Updates

Keystone XL approval is wrong direction

By facilitating the transportation of dirty tar sands fuels, Keystone would add 27.4 million metric tons of global warming pollution to our atmosphere per year. President Trump's executive order advancing the Keystone XL pipeline is definitely a step in the wrong direction. READ MORE.

Report | Environment Iowa

Generating Failure: How Building Nuclear Power Plants Would Set America Back in the Race Against Global Warming

Far from being a solution to global warming, nuclear power will actually set America back in the race to reduce pollution. Nuclear power is too slow and too expensive to make enough of a difference in the next two decades. Moreover, nuclear power is not necessary to provide clean, carbon-free electricity for the long haul.

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News Release | Environment Iowa

New Report: Iowa’s Power Sources Outdated, Under-regulated

Iowa is home to some of the nation's oldest and most polluting coal-fired power plants, according to a new analysis of government data released today by Environment Iowa.  Half a year after a proposal for a new coal plant in Marshalltown was canceled and over one year after a similar proposal for Waterloo was denied, a group of environmental groups are calling for tougher regulation on existing power plants.

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Report | Environment Iowa

America's Biggest Polluters: Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Power Plants in 2007

The United States relies heavily on outdated technology and limited resources for most of its electricity needs. While the production of clean, renewable energy such as wind and solar power is growing, the vast majority of American electricity comes from burning fossil fuels—coal, oil, and natural gas—and from nuclear power.

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Headline

Iowa greenhuse emissions show big jump

Iowa-based emissions of carbon dioxide - the greenhouse gas thought most to blame for climate change - grew at a much faster rate than the national average from 1990 to 2007, an environmental group said Thursday.

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News Release | Environment Iowa

Nearly 3.5 Million Pounds of Toxic Chemicals Discharged into Iowa Waterways

Industrial facilities dumped nearly three and a half million pounds of toxic chemicals into Iowa’s waterways, over 700,000 pounds of which were discharged into the Des Moines and Raccoon rivers, according to a report released today by Environment Iowa titled, Wasting Our Waterways: Industrial Toxic Pollution and the Unfulfilled Promise of the Clean Water Act.

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