News Release | Environment Iowa

New Report: Wind Energy Yields Major Environmental Benefits for Iowa; Reducing Pollution and Saving Water

Wind energy is on the rise in Iowa and providing huge environmental benefits for the state, according to a new report released today by Environment Iowa. Iowa’s wind energy is already avoiding more than 8.4 million metric tons of climate-altering carbon pollution – the equivalent of taking 1.7 million cars off the road, while saving nearly 3.8 billion gallons of water per year – enough to meet the needs of over 158,000 people.

News Release | Environment Iowa Research and Policy Center

The Des Moines River, Haunted by Toxic Discharge and Manure

Today on the shores of The Des Moines River, Environment Iowa held an event to release “Ten Scary Facts about Iowa’s Waterways,” a new factsheet which compiles 10 of the most frightening realities about pollution in the area's most iconic waterway. The group was joined by Craig Cox, Senior Vice President with the Environmental Working Group and Tayler Chicoine, leader of Iowater at Grinnell College.

News Release | Environment Iowa

Environment Iowa Delivers over 5,000 Petition Signatures Calling on Senate to Protect Iowa’s Rivers

Today, the local environmental non-profit organization Environment Iowa delivered over 5,000 petition signatures to Sen. Dick Dearden, Chair of the Natural Resources Committee, calling on Iowa leaders to protect Iowa’s rivers by reducing runoff pollution from corporate agribusiness.

News Release | Environment Iowa Research & Policy Center

Every Single Iowa County Hit By At Least One Recent Weather Disaster; New Report Says Global Warming to Bring More Extreme Weather

While much of Iowa is still suffering from this summer’s drought, which left Iowa’s farmers with $1 billion in crop damages, a new Environment Iowa Research & Policy Center report finds that weather-related disasters are already affecting hundreds of millions of Americans, and documents how global warming could lead to certain extreme weather events becoming even more common or more severe in the future.

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