Report | Environment Iowa Research and Policy Center

Ten Ways Your Community Can Go Solar

This series of guides should serve as a toolkit for communities interested in leading the transition to clean, renewable energy. Each guide illustrates the importance of one of the following policy tools for advancing solar energy adoption, as well as guidelines, case studies and additional resources.

Report | Environment Iowa Research & Policy Center

Destination: Zero Carbon

In the U.S., transportation is climate enemy number one. America’s transportation system produces more greenhouse gas emissions than any other sector of our economy and, on its own, is responsible for 4 percent of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions – more than the entire economies of France and the United Kingdom combined.

Report | Environment Iowa Research & Policy Center and Iowa PIRG Education Fund

Banning Single-Use Plastics

Every day, we use millions of plastic bags, straws and utensils, and foam cups and containers for just a few minutes before tossing them, and then they can pollute our environment for hundreds of years. We can protect our health and marine animals by banning or limiting these products, as hundreds of communities and nine states have already done. Banning Single-use Plastics describes the specific problems, actions, and best practices for reducing these polluting items.

Report | Environment America Research & Policy Center and U.S. PIRG Education Fund

Electric Buses in America

New report profiles six case studies of early electric bus adopters across the nation. By understanding common pitfalls and best practices, cities, agencies and school districts can ensure a smoother roll-out of electric buses, helping reduce climate pollution and protect public health.

Report | Environment Iowa Research and Policy Center

Safe for Swimming?

The Clean Water Act, adopted in 1972 with overwhelming bi-partisan support, had the farsighted and righteous goal of making all our waterways safe for swimming. Yet 46 years later, all too often, Americans visiting their favorite beach are met by an advisory warning that the water is unsafe for swimming.

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